#52 Ancestors Challenge – Week 4 – Invite to Dinner – Why Not Robin Hood?

Fulk FitzWarin III walks through the door of my home and I seated him at the head of our family dinning room table.  He is over 850 years old, grey of hair, sturdy, with a commanding presence, and he is my husband’s 1st cousin 25 x removed.  What to serve someone from the late 1100’s.  I’ve got just the thing.  Legs of Lamb served with roasted potatoes, followed by homemade rye bread and cheese and washed down with red wine, but there will be no huge open fires, straw on the earthen or stone floor, glassless windows or uncomfortably straight backed chairs this evening!

Fulk III was the son of Fulk FitzWarin II who after his own fathers death was raised at court with the then Prince John.  Fulk II and Prince John fought over a game, the outcome of which ensured that they were mortal enemies from that time on and John, upon becoming King, took out his hatred on Fulk III.

I’m just full of questions for this elderly man who is credited with starting the legend of Robin Hood, and the now fabled fall out with King John of England.  Fulk III took the Lordship of Whittington which included the family home of Whittington Castle upon his father’s death in 1197, but he lost the Lordship in 1199 when King John  granted it to Llewellyn ap Iorworth, Prince of Wales.

I want to hear all about Fulk III’s life in the forests of Shropshire during this time, his adventures as he robbed the Royal  Wagon Trains  as they passed through the forest, his life with Maude (upon whom the story of Maid Marion is based), and his reconciliation with the King after he gave away all of Fulk’s family inheritance – including Whittington Castle in Northern Shropshire.

Whittington Castle

I have read many articles about Fulk FitzWarin III who, over his lifetime, fell in and out of favour with his king.  On two documented occasions Fulk III and his followers managed to capture King John and his men to try and secure peace between the families.  King John sent his men into the forest to hunt out Fulk III and his followers a few times, but Fulk was never captured.

I guess there are two main areas that I would love to talk to Faulk III about:

  1. Firstly I would like him to explain how he was able to overcome what would have been a natural resentment, or even hatred, for toward King John after he took Fulk’s inheritance, to later become one of his loyal supporters?   I would love to know what was really going on in that mind.  Did Faulk honestly forgive the King, or was it a matter of “appeasing” the King? 
  2. Secondly, I would love to understand what life in a castle during the middle ages was like; the battles and most definitely what treatments were available for injuries, the role of presiding over arguments between tenants and the metering out of punishments, what the daily weapons practice entailed and what was available to the family in the form of  “the arts” – poetry and music.

Sources:

http://shropshirehistory.com/characters/fitzwarin.htm

http://www.berkshirehistory.com/bios/ffitzwarin.html

http://www.lordsandladies.org/life-in-middle-ages.htm

http://d.lib.rochester.edu/teams/text/fouke-le-fitz-waryn-introduction

http://www.shropshire-promotions.co.uk/SS-7.html

http://www.whittingtoncastle.co.uk/history/index.shtml

Advertisements

TROVE Tuesday – It Happened in Tamworth in 1908

 

Well folks, it would appear that illegal gambling was alive and well in the town my grandparents called home – Tamworth. I was truly unaware that there may have been a relatively large Chinese population in Tamworth, much less a man of Chinese decent running a “common gaming house” from his shop.  The things that people get up to in the county!!

Jan_Gambling_Den_2

Sources:

Gambling At Tamworth,  Evening News (Sydney, NSW 1869 – 1931) Monday 13 January 1908, page 5

#52Ancestors Challenge – Week 3 – Longevity

My 3 x great grandmother Mary Ann Arney nee: Cooper lived a long and full life.  I believe that she must have been of a very robust nature to attain the age of 91 years given this period in time was rampant with poverty and substandard medical care.

Mary Ann Cooper was the second of 14 children born to William and Ann Cooper nee: Shortland and was baptised at Sutton-Veney, Wiltshire, England on 30 Jul 1815

Mary_Ann_Cooper1

By the time of Mary Ann’s marriage to Joseph Arney (also known as Joseph Arnold) in 1837 her youngest sibling, a brother, was just a year old! 

Mary Ann and Joseph’s second child was just a year old the family arrived in Australia as Assisted Immigrants aboard the ship William Jardine.  The family settled in the Hunter area of New South Wales living at Raymond Terrace. 

Raymond Terrace, Illustrated Sydney News, 10 Dec 1853

Here they added 8 more children to their family, but they were unhappy and not wanting to stay in Australia any longer.  In January of 1857, after 16 years of hard work, they boarded the ship Light of the Age with 7 of the children.  They had also lost a son in Raymond Terrace in January of 1857.

When Mary Ann boarded the ship she was heavily pregnant with her 11th child and this little girl was born in Sulawesi, Indonesia.  Interestingly, they named her after the ship – Light Amelia.  Sadly, little Light Amelia died very shortly after arriving back in England.

Once again the family decided to leave England for a better life.  Coincidentally, they boarded the ship Light of the Age.  Mary Ann and Joseph’s last child was born in Kaladar, Ontario, Canada on 1 Sept 1861.

Apparently the couple and their children enjoyed the life they carved out for themselves in Canada because both Mary Ann and Joseph passed away there; Joseph in 1886 and Mary Ann in 1906.

My own 2 x great grandmother, Elizabeth Harney along with her younger sister Ann were the 2 children that stayed behind in Australia. Elizabeth had married in July of 1856 at the Anglican Church in Raymond Terrace and Ann married in July 1857 near Tamworth, 6 months after their parents had left for England.

Mary Ann had not come from a wealthy family yet she had travelled the world, she successfully delivered 12 healthy children in fairly quick succession, she worked hard along side her husband through the excessive Australian heat, endured hunger and heartache on different continents, travelled by ship which was still a risky undertaking in this period of history, and survived it all to attain the ripe old age of 91 years.  Must have been a strong and formidable woman, I think.

Sources:

Baptism:  England & Wales Christening Records, 1530-1906, Found on Ancestry.com

Raymond Terrace:  Illustrated Sydney News, (NSW 1853 – 1872),10 Dec 1853, page 3

TROVE Tuesday–It Happened in Tamworth in 1908

As I trawled the articles for January 1908 I noticed the sad article about the scalding death of Thomas Fowler (born Sydney E Thomas Fowler).  The newspaper report states that Thomas was 21 years old however a subsequent report says that Thomas was just 2 1/2 years old.  Either way, the loss of a son in this way is unthinkable.

Jan_Scalding

Jan_Scalding_2

The second report gives more information about Thomas’s father and his occupation and I certainly wonder if my grandparents might have known the family.

Sources:

Fatal Scalding Accident – TROVE – The Sydney Morning Herald (NSW 1842 – 1954) Wednesday 8 Jan 1908, page 10

Scalding Accident – TROVE – Manilla Express (NSW 1899 – 1954) Saturday 11 Jan 1908, page 4

#52weekancestors Challenge – Week 2

This will be my first post for the 52 Ancestors in 52 weeks challenge as I have “come late to the party”.  At first glance the prompt for this week seems easy.  Not so!  The prompts is simply – Favourite Photo – but I have sooooo many favourites, how will I choose?

I decided to combine week 1 prompt – Start  – with week 2 prompt – Favourite Photo – and will showcase my two favourite photo’s, both of which started me on my long love of family history just on 40 years ago!

Julia Duncan 10

Firstly, the photo of my  Great Grandmother Julia Duncan whom I have written about numerous times on the blog.  Her story can be read here.  For me, when I first saw this photo when I was about 20 years old or so, it was like a light bulb went on in my head.  The need to know more about this woman was instantaneous, and thereafter I viewed all old family photographs with a different mindset and keen eyes.  They were no longer photo’s of boring people that lived eons ago; they had became a tool for seeking clues, a window into their life story which was MY history – and I was totally hooked.

My own mother couldn’t tell me a great deal about the beautiful figure in the photo apart from her name and the name of her first husband, but over the years I gained valuable insight into the strong woman that she became.

I learned that as a child she lived with her parents on the gold fields at Nundle in NSW . There were wonderful stories told to me by older family members about how Julia washed her long brown hair and rinsed it in honey and water so as to be able to style it.  Julia married firstly to Henry Watts Bailey and had 3 beautiful children, but sadly lost her husband at an early age.  Julia joined the Salvation Army and was known to be of quite a religious nature.  She then went on to manage a boarding house to enable her to raise her children.  Finally, Julia found love again and remarried adding another 6 children to her family.

Henry Watts Bailey

The other photo I dearly love is one of Julia’s first husband Henry Watts Bailey whom you can read more about here.  The photo is truly a treasure as this is the only known photo of the man.  Perhaps it was taken on his wedding day, in light of the fact that he is wearing a flower on his lapel.  Henry looks strong and confident here and yet just 6 short years later he would be dead.  I always knew that there was a story to be found in this man as the family weren’t forthcoming with any information, and it was some years before I found out just how Henry had died.  In his short life he became a hard worker and he dearly loved his wife and children.  In return he was deeply loved by his wife Julia.

These days, when I travel through Singleton on my way to Sydney for a visit with family, I try to make time to stop and put flowers on his grave, a lonely headstone sitting on the edge of the Whittingham Cemetery.  Rest peacefully Henry, I think of you often.

Henry Bailey Headstone

TROVE Tuesday – It Happened in Tamworth in 1908

I have long wanted to participate in Trove Tuesday, but never got around to starting.  1908 was the year that my grandmother Ines Maude Smith married my grandfather Edward Thomas Bailey and I just wondered what life was like in Tamworth at that time.  My first Trove Tuesday post comes from January 1908 and covers a game of cricket between a visiting Fijian team and our local lads.

Jan_Cricket_Team

  • The outcome of the game was less than favourable for the local team. 

Jan_Cricket_Team_Outcome_2

  • And then there was the controversy over payment for the Fijian team!!

Jan_Cricket_Team_Gate_Takings

The outcome of the case didn’t happen until February – so watch for the future post.  With a population of just over 6000 people in Tamworth at the time, the turn out of 2500 residents to a local cricket game was impressive.  Now, I love cricket and my mother loved cricket so, I wonder if my grandmother and grandfather were amongst the spectators?

Sources:

Fijians At Tamworth – TROVE – Evening News, (Sydney, NSW 1869 – 1931) Friday Jan 10 1908, page 7

Fijians Defeat Tamworth – TROVE – The Sydney Morning Herald (NSW 1842 – 1954), Monday Jan 13 1908, page 10

Fijians And Gate Takings – TROVE – Evening News, (Sydney, NSW 1869 – 1931) Thursday Jan 6 1908, page 5

Happy 4th Birthday to Us

 

 

4th

 

Can you believe that it has been four years since I started The Keeper of Stories!!  I’m amazed, as the time has passed so very quickly.

I haven’t been posting in the last few months, as I’m afraid that life has just gotten in the way.  I have been having such a marvellous time with travel, family & friends, and cooking, but I will be starting back to blogging next month, November, with an account of our trip to Fiji.  This will be following by a month long blog in December of all things Christmas,  and how to save money but still have a blast.  We will then return to family history stories in January. 

I have re-vamped the blog giving it a fresh new look so stay with me folks, it’ll be great fun.

Julie

Source:

Photo:  Photo taken from : http://www.passportmagazine.ru/article/914/

Marriage of Christina Di Salvia to Henry Callan Schofield

Christina Di Salvia &  Schofield wedding

Isn’t the bride just beautiful, such a pretty face, shinning with happiness and full of hope and trust that life will be good to her new husband and herself.   Christina Lorna Di Salvia was just 21 years old when she married Henry Callan Schofield who was 25 year old.  Their bridal party consisted of (from l to r) Walter Di Salvia, Gwen Schofield, Henry (groom), Christina (bride), Joseph Di Salvia (father of the bride), Juanita Di Salvia, Stan Hunt, flower girls – names unknown.

Christina and Henry were married at the Parramatta Seventh Day Adventist Church, which is where my own family attended church for many years.  The church was a magnificent old building, built in a very dark brick with lots of windows letting in sunshine.  Sadly it is no longer standing.

This couple shared a long and happy life together raising two children, my cousins Raymond (b. 1937) and Beryl (b. 1942).  I remember that they had an orange farm at Windsor.  My mum and dad visited the farm rarely, but I have distinct memories of eating juicy oranges straight from the tree, and oddly – the old grandfather clock  which kept me awake at night!!  Silly that I can’t remember where the clock was within the house, only that it made a lot of noise.

Below is the wedding announcement that appeared in the church paper – The Australasian Record, on 26 Aug 1935, page 7.  The charming “old style” wording is definately from a time long past.  Referring to the couple as “contracting parties”, “reverence and charm” and “bower of beauty” hint at the gentle, loving and serious nature of the event.

Wedding Announcement

My Aunty Chris passed away at the age of 81 years and my Uncle Henry passed away at the age of 101 years and they are buried together in the Tweed Heads Lawn and General Cemetary.

Postcard of General Kuroki

General Kuroki 1844 – 1923

I have decided to showcase this postcard of General Kuroki from my grandfather’s postcard collection.  This of course led me to “Google” him to find out a little more about the person behind the postcard.

I learned that General Kuroki was the Commander-in-Chief of the 1st Japanese Corps at the beginning of the Russo-Japanese War 1904-1905.  Then I looked up the Russo-Japanese War, of which I knew nothing.  Sometimes I think that a person could do nothing but study history for a lifetime, and still not know it all!

Kuroki Tamemoto was born in May 1844  and was the son of a samurai.  It would seem that he was in the Japanese army for most of his life, gaining the rank of Lieutenant in 1869, Captain in 1871 and Major in 1872, and then at the age of 31 he was made a Lieutenant-Colonel.  Skipping through the ranks he finally made General in 1903.  His forces had a series of battle successes during the Russo-Japanese War including the battle of Yalu River, the battle of Liaoyang, the battle of Shaho and the battle of Mukden.  General Kuroki retired from military service in 1909, dying of pneumonia in 1923 at the age of 79.

At the time of the Russo-Japanese war my grandfather was only 16 years old and living in the Tamworth area and in July of 1904 snow was clearly seen on the hills around the town.   The Australian Prime Minister was Alfred Deakin;  1904 saw the women’s suffrage granted in Tasmania and Ipswich in Queensland was proclaimed a city.

Sources:

Snow: http://trove.nla.gov.au/newspaper/article/14661550

1904: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/1904_in_Australia

 

 

 

 

 

 

Create a free website or blog at WordPress.com.

Up ↑

mylifeonedayatatimeblog

The Journal of Julie Preston

Narrandera Garden Club

Friendship through Gardening

The Family Kalamazoo

A genealogical site devoted to the history of the DeKorn and Zuidweg families of Kalamazoo and the Mulder family of Caledonia

Pacific Paratrooper

This WordPress.com site is Pacific War era information

Andrew's Archives

Unforgetting family

douglust

she's a threadhead

More Than Greens

Mostly vegan/always vegetarian food, cruelty-free beauty, travel, and nature.

The Armchair Genealogist

The Preston & Di Salvia Family Trees

Hoosier Daddy?

The Preston & Di Salvia Family Trees

mylifeonedayatatimeblog

The Journal of Julie Preston

Narrandera Garden Club

Friendship through Gardening

The Family Kalamazoo

A genealogical site devoted to the history of the DeKorn and Zuidweg families of Kalamazoo and the Mulder family of Caledonia

Pacific Paratrooper

This WordPress.com site is Pacific War era information

Andrew's Archives

Unforgetting family

douglust

she's a threadhead

More Than Greens

Mostly vegan/always vegetarian food, cruelty-free beauty, travel, and nature.

The Armchair Genealogist

The Preston & Di Salvia Family Trees

Hoosier Daddy?

The Preston & Di Salvia Family Trees